Living abroad and its impact

Working and living abroad can transform you into someone a bit more humble, especially when you come from a country where things usually work like they should – ok, let’s not talk about the comedy of errors at the new Berlin-Brandenburg Airport…

When you survived over the years unhealthy drinking habits, a confusing… body language (nodding means “no” and shaking your head means “yes”), the worst drivers in the world, and a mafia war (Bulgaria), temperatures above 45 degrees in summer (Jordan), one of the highest lead and dust congestions in the air worldwide (Cairo/Egypt), temporary lack of water (Jordan, Kosovo), government officials with the manners of cattle thieves (Turkey), blood feuds, “sworn” virgins, and disastrous consequences of a change in the government (Albania – after the tenant living upstairs became an EX-Prime Minister, the new government decided wisely that all inhabitants of this building should become EX-clients of the water and electricity company for about 23 hours each day), and natural disasters like earthquakes and volcano eruptions you can watch from your window as long as the dust doesn’t force you to move to another place (Indonesia) – after all these experiences and a few others I am not mentioning here you are either a case for a mental institution or you have successfully learned to enjoy life even more when minor things don’t work as you would have expected it in your previous life.

And hey, after all I had and have a lot of fun in all these places!

Therefore the two days without water in Prishtina are just a minor nuisance – but ask me again tomorrow when I start to smell like a badger 😉

(originally published on my FB page on June 13, 2013 – but since I had the same experience again very recently, I decided to post it here again)

© Thomas Hübner and mytwostotinki.com, 2013/4. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Thomas Hübner and mytwostotinki.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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